Count 14

Count 14- Lottery Funds represent a small and declining share of public school funding. Created to "benefit students", Lottery Funds were earmarked for textbooks and instructional supplies. However, like all revenues streams created to "benefit students", Legislative action allowed these revenue streams to be converted to the Districts general fund. By 2003 a State study concluded that 80% of Lottery Funds for public education were in fact going to employee salaries, pensions and benefits and not to textbooks, materials and supplies.  In 2015-16 Lottery funds are projected to hit a record $6 billion in revenues and provide $1.4 billion for schools. In 2003; at the time of the study, Lottery Revenues were $2.8 billion with $1 billion in funding going to education. So while lottery revenues have trippeled since 2003, contributions towards education have remained relatively flat. 

Background

1.      In 1984, Proposition 37 amended the California Constitution to authorize the establishment of a statewide lottery. As an initiative statute, the California State Lottery Act of 1984 created the California State Lottery Commission and gave it broad powers to oversee the operations of a statewide lottery. The purpose of the Lottery Act was to provide supplemental monies to benefit public education (specifically to provide guaranteed funds for textbooks and supplies) without the imposition of additional or increased taxes. The Lottery is administered by a five-person Commission appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the State Senate.

Revenues:

28% to public schools

6% to Colleges and Universities

50% to Prize winners

16% to administrative costs

The Lottery Act initially required that 50 percent of total annual revenues be returned to the public in the form of prizes and at least 34 percent of total revenues be allocated to the benefit of public education. No more than 16 percent of total revenues were to be used for administrative costs.

In 2010, the Lottery Act was changed to allow the Lottery flexibility to pay out more money in prizes and reduce the administrative cost limit to 13 percent of total revenues. Along with that flexibility, the new law required the Lottery to meet minimum levels of contribution to public education.

Revenues to education are placed in a special fund, known as the California State Lottery Education Fund, which holds revenues until they are allocated on a per capita basis, using prior year certified average daily attendance data, to the following categories: K-12 education, Community Colleges, the California State University, the University of California, and other educational entities.

Once a quarter, the Lottery sends its educational supplemental dollars to the State Controller’s Office (SCO) who then audits those contributions. The SCO in turn distributes them to County Treasurers who then send the money to County Offices of Education, School Districts and the administrators of higher education. Those entities determine how Lottery funds are distributed and spent within their systems. The Lottery is not involved in this decision-making process.

For 2015-16 Lottery revenues are projected to hit a record high of $6 billion (up from $5.5 billion in 2014-15) and is expected to provide an $1.4 billion in revenues to schools (up from $1.3 billion in 2013-14). That will mean an additional $181 ADA ($140 general fund, $41 restricted for materials and supplies.)

Revenues from the lottery are allocated as follows:

50% is returned to players as prizes

a minimum of 34% is allocated for public education

a maximum of 16% is allocated for administration

2.      In March 2000, Prop 20 was passed by the Legislature as Assembly Bill 1453 and changed the way Lottery Funds were allocated.

Under Prop 20, K-14 schools received a larger percentage of lottery funds based on the wording of the Proposition which required that 50% of the Statewide growth in the lottery fund will first be distributed to K-14 schools to be earmarked for instructional materials. Then remaining funds would be distributed equally based on ADA. That meant that higher education and other state operated schools would no longer receive a share of the first 50% of growth funds. K-14 schools were getting a much larger slice of the pie under Prop 20.

3.     In 2010 AB 142 Passed which again modified the lottery allocation formula:

A.     Not less than 87 percent (an increase of three percent from current law) of the amount of the total revenues shall be returned to the public as follows:

(1)  Not less than 50 percent of the total revenues shall be returned to the public in the form of prizes, as determined by the Commission.

Repeals the requirement that a fixed 50 percent of the total annual revenues shall to be returned to the public in prizes.

(2) The percentage of the total revenues to be allocated for public education shall be established by the Commission at a level designed to maximize the total net revenues for public education.

Repeals the requirement that at least 34 percent of the total annual revenues are to be allocated to the benefit of public education.

B.     No more than 13 percent (a decrease of three percent from current law) of the total revenues shall be allocated for the payment of expenses of  the Lottery.

Comments 

"This bill requires the State Controller to review the amount of revenue that gets allocated to public education at the end of each year for five years, and then repeals the modified allocation formula in this bill if in any of those five years the Controller determines that the revenue to public education fell short of the amount allocated in the last full fiscal year prior to the enactment of this bill (presumably FY 2008-09). Consequently, this bill does leave the allocation to public education vulnerable for one year in the event that a determination is made that funding provided to schools was less than the amount in FY 2008-09 - $1,048,694,000.  However, if the modification of the allocation formula does result in additional lottery sales as the Lottery Commission believes, there could be a significant increase in the amount of funding that is allocated to the benefit of public education.  

The Lottery currently generates total sales revenue of approximately $2.96 billion annually, with over $1 billion allocated to the benefit of public education.  The intent of this bill is to allocate more money to prizes which in turn is expected to generate an increase in total sales revenue, allowing for an increase in the current level of funding allocated to public education.  However, the exact impact of these changes will be a result of allocation strategies of the Lottery Commission, incentives to retailers, and other marketing events, all of which may ultimately influence the consumers' behavior on lottery spending."

Lottery Revenues:

The California Lottery does not provide any access to Lottery Revenues and Expenses for the Period 1985 - 1998 (except for the apportionment to education) without a formal Public Records Request. A formal request was made via e-mail on November 2, 2015 to: http://www.calottery.com/contact-us/public-records-request. A formal Public Records Request was also sent to the State Controllers Office via e-mail. Chief Counsel for the State Controllers Office responded very quickly stating:

"Your request for records from 1985 to 1998 covers a period for records that date back 30 years to 15 years ago. Assuming that these records existed at one time within the State Controllers Office, they have long passed the record retention period of this office of 5 years."

The Public Records Request Produced the following response:

The following data has been found from a variety of sources with links provided.

1984:  November 6, 1984 Proposition 37 The Lottery Act was Approved by 58% of the Voters with a clear mission: to provide supplemental funding for public schools and colleges.

1985:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

  State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education: $555,457,022 (125.67 per student)  

1986:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education: $410,880,929 ($89.68 per student)

1987:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education: $647,361,315 ($138.78 per student)

1988:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

 State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education: $843,557,516 ($176.08 per student)

1989:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

 State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education: $783,026,959 ($154.47 per student)

1990:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

   State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education:$645,693,335 ($128.64 per student)

1991:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

   State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education: $400,869,886 ($76.55 per student)

1992:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

   State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education: $495,625,449 ($92.51 per student)

1993:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

   State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education: $556,290,312 ($101.63 per student)

1994:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

   State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education: $642,689584 ($115.83 per student)

1995:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

  State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education: $691,363,263 ($120.71 per student)

1996:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

   State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education:  $610,907,801 ($105.10 per student)

1997:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

  State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education: $675,117,674 ($113.67 per student)

1998:  Lottery CalEDFacts: K-12 Lottery Revenue 1985 - 2009-10

  State Controllers Office: Lottery Educational Apportionments

Revenues: 

Prizes: 

Administrative: 

Education: 727,633,935

Total ADA: $119.19 per student ($114.69 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  4.50)

1999:  California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1999

Revenues: $2,498,298,488

Prizes: $1,307,422,871

Administrative: $341,075,721

Education: $899,349,947

Total ADA: $122.98 per student ($115.45 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  7.53)

2000:  California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2000

Revenues: $2,598,378,990

Prizes: $1,369,435,482 (52.70%)

Administrative:  $343,181,662 (13.21%)

Education:  $948,036,660 (36.49%) 

Total ADA $141.48 per student ($123.41 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  18.07)

* Prizes + Administration + Education =102.4% of Revenues

* Expenses $1,369,435,482 + $343,181,662+  $948,036,660 = $2,660,653,804

Revenues: $2,660,653,804

Prizes: $1,369,435,482 (51.47%)

Administrative:  $343,181,662 (12.89%) 

Education:  $948,036,660 (35.63%)

In March 2000, Prop 20, passed by the Legislature as Assembly Bill 1453 changed the way Lottery Funds were allocated.

Under Prop 20, K-14 schools received a larger percentage of lottery funds based on the wording of the Proposition which required that 50% of the Statewide growth in the lottery fund will first be distributed to K-14 schools to be earmarked for instructional materials. Then remaining funds would be distributed equally based on ADA. That meant that higher education and other state operated schools would no longer receive a share of the first 50% of growth funds. K-14 schools were getting a much larger slice of the pie under Prop 20.

2001:  California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2001

Revenues: $2,894,841,523

Prizes: $1,503,768,458 (51.95%)

Administrative: $385,473,932 (13.32%)

1,111,635,107 (38.40%)

Total ADA $131.37 per student ($116.13 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  15.24)

* Prizes + Administration + Education =103.67% of Revenues

* Expenses $1,503,768,458 + $385,473,458 + $1,111,635,107 = $3,000,877,497

Revenues: $3,000,877,497

Prizes: $1,503,768,458 (50.11%)

Administrative: $385,473,932 (12.85%) 

Education: $1,111,635,107 (37.04%)

2002:  California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2002

Revenues: $2,896,372,533 

Prizes: $1,502,966,618 (51.9%)

Administrative: $382,897,745 (13.21%)

Education: $1,064,064,146 (36.74%)

Total ADA $123.36 per student ($110.81 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  12.55)

* Prizes + Administration + Education = 101.85% of Revenues

* Expenses  $1,502,966,618 + $382,897,745 + $1,064,064,146 = $2,949,928,509 

Revenues: $2,949,928,509 

Prizes: $1,502,966,618 (50.95%)

Administrative: $382,897,745 (12.98%)

Education: $1,064,064,146 (36.07%)

2003:  California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2003

Revenues: $2,781,569,856 

Prizes:  $1,451,804,079 (52.2%)

Administrative: $362,342,273 (13%)

Education: $1,019,816,972 (34.8%)

Total ADA $132.23 per student ($114.79 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  17.44)

2004:  California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2004

Revenues: $2,973,975,717

Prizes: $1,566,027,494 (52.66%)

Administrative: $370,821,346 (12.47%)

Education: $1,094,256,988 (34.87%)

Total ADA $142.33 per student ($119.87 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  22.46)

2005:  California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2005

Revenues: $3,333,620,669 

Prizes: $1,795,254,439 (53.86%)

Administrative: $400,439,862 (12.01%)

Education: $1,175,794,256 (34.13%)

Total ADA $156.55 per student ($127.20 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  29.35)

2006:  California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2006

Revenues: $3,584,996,251

Prizes: $1,932,721,443 (53.91%)

Administrative: $413,062,844 (11.52%)

Education: $1,287,998,079 (35.57%)

Total ADA $145.32 per student ($121.61 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  23.71)

2007:  California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2007

Revenues: $3,318,346,505 

Prizes: $1,765,643,368 (53.21%)

Administrative: 400,270,448 (12.06%)

Education: 1,206,147,082 (34.73%)

Total ADA $130.26 per student ($113.79 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  16.47)

2008: California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2008

Revenues: $3,049,620,915 

Prizes: $1,619,473,498 (53.1%)

Administrative: $380,245,309 (12.43%)

Education: $1,094,945,310 (34.43%)

Total ADA $121.92 per student ($108.54 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  13.38)

2009:  http://static.www.calottery.com/~/media/Publications/Reports_to_the_Public/LotteryAR2009English.pdf

Revenues: $2,970,971,277 

Prizes: $1,556,120,634 (52.3%)

Administrative: $396,190,567 (13.33%)

Education: $1,048,693,816 (34.29%)

Total ADA $125.88 per student ($110.37 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  15.51)

2010:  California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2010  

Revenues: $3,086,210,845

Prizes: $1,611,371,074 (52%)

Administrative: $405,357,465 (13%)

Education: $1,089,747,218 (35%)

Total ADA $125.88 per student ($110.37 per student general fund- Restricted for Instructional Materials $  15.51)

2010 AB142 Allocated more money to prizes with the intent to increase total lottery revenues, allowing for greater revenues for public education.

Limits Administration Expenses to 13% of sales 

87% of sales must be returned to the Public in the form of prizes or contributions to education.

The law gave the lottery flexibility to pay out a higher percentage of its revenues in prizes, but only if it does so in a way that increases the total amount of money that goes to education.

2011: California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2011 

Revenues: $3,438,577,998

Prizes: $1,904,787,955 (55%)

Administrative: $432,982,150 (13%)

Education: $1,128,551,245 (32%)

2012: California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2012

Revenues: $4,371,491,746 

Prizes: $2,560,306,589 (55%)

Administrative: $512,822,653 (12%)

Education: $1,320,726,555 (30%)

?: 3%

(3%) not accounted for Expenses add up to: $4,393,742,497 (missing revenues of $22,250,751)

2013: California Lottery Report to the Public for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2013  

Revenues: $4,445,870,040

Prizes: $2,652,095,102 (59%)

Administrative: $532,961,588 (12%)

Education: $1,284,370,779 (29%)

    United State's Census 2013 California Lottery Revenues/Expenses 

Total Revenues: $4,445,874 

Prizes: $2,652,095  (59%)

Administration: $224,063 (6%)

Available Proceeds $1,569,716 (35%) - 6% went to Administration- 29% went to Education

2014: California Lottery Report to the Public for Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2014 

 California Lottery Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for FYE June 30, 2014 

Total Revenue: $5,077,977,283

Prizes: $3,082,376,405 (61.2%)

Administration: $625,621,621 (12.4%)

Education: $1,326,663,398 (26.4%)

2015:   Source: http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/aa/lo/lottrevpro1516ltr1.asp

"2015–16 Lottery Revenue Projections

Please note the change in the ADA used for calculation lottery funding. The estimated per ADA rate increase in 2015–16 is largely due to the change in the ADA used to calculate lottery funding. Pursuant to Government Code Section 8880.5(a)(2) for fiscal years 2008–09 through 2014–15, the ADA used for purposes of calculating lottery included the ADA for Adult Education and Regional Occupational Centers and Programs (ROCPs) reported in 2007–08. Beginning in 2015–16, the Adult Education and ROCPs ADA will no longer be included for the purpose of calculating lottery funding which will impact every LEA’s funding. As such, the CDE advises LEAs to be aware of the change and ensure that ADA from the Adult Education and ROCP are not included when estimating the 2015–16 lottery projections.

The California State Lottery Commission is projecting total sales of $6 billion for 2015–16 and estimates that this level of sales would result in $1.4 billion for education. Based on these projections, the CDE estimates that the lottery will provide $181 per ADA ($140 per ADA in unrestricted lottery revenues and $41 per ADA in Proposition 20 revenues) for 2015–16. As noted above, the estimate per ADA rate increase is largely due to the exclusion of Adult Education and ROCP ADA for purposes of calculating lottery funding. We will monitor actual sales each quarter and advise you of any changes to the projection."

Projected Total Revenue $6 billion

Projected Education Funding $1.4 billion (23%)

Projected ADA $181 per student ($140 General Fund $41 Restricted -Materials and Supplies)

4.    Lottery Revenue Paid to CUSD 2007-08 to Present  - Source: http://www.sco.ca.gov/Files-ARD-Payments/Lottery/lottery_annual_k12.pdf  page 636 and 637

 

5. Site Supply Budget for CUSD:

2015-16:  

On June 24, 2015, at the adoption of the 2015-16 Budget, CUSD estimated Lottery Revenues $6.7 million $162 per ADA ($128 General Fund Revenues - $34 Restricted Materials/Supplies) and projected ADA of 48,354.76

Source: http://capousd.ca.schoolloop.com/file/1229223560406/1218998864154/1095880305525509113.pdf page 210-211

2014-15:

On June 25, 2014, at the adoption of the 2014-15 Budget CUSD estimated Lottery Revenues $6.5 million $156 per ADA ($126 General Fund Revenues - $30 Restricted Materials/Supplies) ADA is 48,354.76

Actual Enrollment 2014-15: http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/Enrollment/GradeEnr.aspx?cChoice=DistEnrGrd&cYear=2014-15&cSelect=3066464--Capistrano%20Unified&TheCounty=&cLevel=District&cTopic=Enrollment&myTimeFrame=S&cType=ALL&cGender=B

K-5 23,539 X $21 = $494,319

6-8 12,914 X $25 = $322,850

9-12 17,583 X $33 = $580,239 

Total Lottery Fund allocated to Supplies $1,397,408 about 21% - 79% of CUSD's Lottery Funds go to Salaries, Pensions and Benefits. The intent of the 1984 Lottery Act was to ensure that money generated from the Lottery went to textbooks and supplies - not to employee compensation.

CUSD is spending $1,397408/54,036 = $25,86 per student They are receiving $126 per student or 21% which is why parents are being forced to fundraise for paper and school supplies.

Source: http://capousd.ca.schoolloop.com/file/1229223560406/1218998864154/8618922709406337324.pdf at page 208

 

2013-14:

On June 26, 2013, at the adoption of the 2013-14 Budget CUSD estimated Lottery Revenues $6.5 million $154 per ADA ($124 General Fund Revenues - $30 Restricted Materials/Supplies) ADA is 48,383.58

Source: http://capousd.ca.schoolloop.com/file/1229223560406/1218998864154/8706197883023880986.pdf at page 192

According to the Lottery, CUSD received a total of $8,534,768.95 in Lottery Funds based on ADA of 52,489 = $162 per ADA.

Of that amount $6,739,815.23 was unrestricted while $1,794,953.72 was restricted (textbooks, materials and supplies) ($128.40 unrestricted and $34.20 restricted)

Enrollment for funding purposes has to exclude the number of students enrolled in charter schools:

Capistrano Connections Academy 2106

Community Roots Academy 400

Journey 358

Opportunities for Learning 98

Oxford Preparatory Academy 776

Total 3,738

52,489 - 3,738 = 48,751 students for funding purposes

Restricted Funds of 48,751 X $34.2 = $1,667,126 

2012-13  

On June 27, 2012, at the adoption of the 2012-13 Budget CUSD estimated Lottery Revenues $6.2 million $141.75 per ADA ($118 General Fund Revenues - $23.75 Restricted Instructional Supplies) ADA is 49,240

Source: http://capousd.ca.schoolloop.com/file/1229223560406/1218998864154/9066401469657812055.pdf at page 18.170

According to the Lottery Records in 2012-13 CUSD received $8,068,303.12 based on ADA of 52,701 = $153.09 per ADA ($6,492,832.62 General Fund Revenues $124 per ADA - $1,575,470.50 Restricted Instructional Supplies $29.89 per ADA)

6.     CUSD's Technology Plan

The intent of the Lottery was to have a steady revenue stream for textbooks and instructional supplies. The State needs to change the Lottery Law one more time mandating that the full education apportionment of Lottery Funds be restricted to Instructional Materials including computers/I-pads/Chromebooks since the State is mandating that testing be computerized. 

According to the August 12, 2015 Board of Trustees Meeting, Agenda Item #12 Exhibit #12

CUSD has 24,000 Chrome books on campus. 

CUSD Purchased Discovery Education Plus (a district wide initiative) made to ensure that all teachers have access to multimedia content, a safe research environment, standards-based videos, images, and articles, and a space for students to be assigned work, assessments, and project space. 70% of the schools paid for this program with school site funds- the remaining were purchased by the District.

Youtube.com is used by teachers and administrative staff as an educational tool. A tiered filtering system for Youtube use. While teachers can see and use Youtube, High School and Middle School students are directed to Youtube for Education. Elementary School students have no access to Youtube.

The District has adopted required digital literacy skills that CUSD students will need to master in order to be college or career ready: These skills are suppose to be attached in Appendix "A", but are not currently posted on the Board Agenda for parents or the Public to see.

"The District has supported four "laptops for learning" bring your own device (BYOD) schools over the past 12 years." (It should be 2 years - since 2013) Oso Grande Elementary, Ladera Middle, Ladera Elementary, and Chaparral Elementary. Aliso Niguel High School has had a BYOD for the last 3 years and Wagon Wheel elementary is in the first pilot stages of an IPAD BYOD at 3rd and 4th grade. All Middle and High School campuses have the option to allow students to bring devices if students agree to abide by District policy regarding use.

Each site has chosen how and when to refresh their classroom technology, including whether to mount projectors, when to buy projector bulbs, when to purchase new laptops for teachers, how many computer labs or rolling carts to have on-site, etc.  

At page 26-

"The vast majority of classrooms has a dedicated LCD projector and documented, funded and sustained through site gift funds.

* This policy is of concern - it creates equity issues- will schools in less affluent areas be able to refresh technology as often as school in more affluent areas? It is the State/District's responsibility to provide a FREE and ADEQUATE education to all students - the District cannot rely on fundraising and donations to pay for instructional supplies, materials and equipment.

At Page 33-

"The District intends to track usage of parents portal (by site, class etc) and downloads of CUSD mobile app."

Why is the District going to track a parents use of the District web site? 

The District is faced with finding a funding source to continually be able to refresh aging technology devices. This is a new ongoing expense that the District does not have an ongoing revenue source for, and in fact has been relying on fundraising and donations to sustain. 

The LCFF Law freezes k-12 funding at 2008 levels by the year 2021. 

CUSD is not in a financial position to pay for expenses that were not budgeted in 2008. The intentional lack of adequate funding is depriving every student in CUSD of their constitutional right to a FREE and ADEQUATE education.  Without new sustainable revenue streams, the quality of education that CUSD students will continue to receive will be poor due to increased class sizes, facilities that are not being maintained and programs that will never be restored. It is simply not possible for CUSD to provide a basic education to students in 2016 when revenues are frozen at 2008 levels. Taxpayers and the Public should not be asked to fundraise to pay for ongoing technology expenses. The District must budget for technology expenses out of District funds.

The Lottery Funds should be used for their intended purpose, not to fund employee compensation.